Essay on modern day slavery

In July, the Senate rejected the bonus 62 to 18. Most of the protesters went home, aided by Hoover's offer of free passage on the rails. Ten thousand remained behind, among them a hard core of Communists and other organizers. On the morning of July 28, forty protesters tried to reclaim an evacuated building in downtown Washington scheduled for demolition. The city's police chief, Pellham Glassford, sympathetic to the marchers, was knocked down by a brick. Glassford's assistant suffered a fractured skull. When rushed by a crowd, two other policemen opened fire. Two of the marchers were killed.
Source
Bud Fields and his family. Alabama. 1935 or 1936. Photographer: Walker Evans.
Source
Squatter's Camp, Route 70, Arkansas, October, 1935.
Photographer: Ben Shahn
Source
Philipinos cutting lettuce, Salinas, California, 1935. Photographer: Dorothea Lange.
In order to maximize their ability to exploit farm workers, California employers recruited from China, Japan, the Philippines, Puerto Rico, Mexico, the American south, and Europe.
Source
Roadside stand near Birmingham, Alabama, 1936. Photographer: Walker Evans.
Source
Farmer and sons, dust storm, Cimarron County, Oklahoma, 1936. Photographer: Arthur Rothstein.
The drought that helped cripple agriculture in the Great Depression was the worst in the climatological history of the country. By 1934 it had dessicated the Great Plains, from North Dakota to Texas, from the Mississippi River Valley to the Rockies. Vast dust storms swept the region.
Source
Migrant pea pickers camp in the rain. California, February, 1936. Photographer: Dorothea Lange.
Source
In one of the largest pea camps in California. February, 1936. Photographer: Dorothea Lange.
Source
The photograph that has become known as "Migrant Mother" is one of a series of photographs that Dorothea Lange made in February or March of 1936 in Nipomo, California. Lange was concluding a month's trip photographing migratory farm labor around the state for what was then the Resettlement Administration. In 1960, Lange gave this account of the experience:  I saw and approached the hungry and desperate mother, as if drawn by a magnet. I do not remember how I explained my presence or my camera to her, but I do remember she asked me no questions. I made five exposures, working closer and closer from the same direction. I did not ask her name or her history. She told me her age, that she was thirty-two. She said that they had been living on frozen vegetables from the surrounding fields, and birds that the children killed. She had just sold the tires from her car to buy food. There she sat in that lean- to tent with her children huddled around her, and seemed to know that my pictures might help her, and so she helped me. There was a sort of equality about it. (From: Popular Photography , Feb. 1960).
Source

The fact remains that 64% of our population remains to date illiterate, and it will be a revolutionary act if computers were made the full use of and worked with to spread educational awareness, in all areas, especially the underprivileged sector. They can be used to plan out lessons, and lessons can be taught on the computers too, the benefit of the prospect lying in the fact that computers excel at lots of different things altogether, which means they can be used to teach not only limited subjects but be used to spread education with reference to all kinds, including text, numbers and graphics.

Modern Day Heroes

The oldest civilizations developed a system of powerful gods that would protect their city or nation. When one nation defeated another, it was assumed that the nation that won had the stronger god. As Greece developed into a strong nation and came to power, it dominated most of the world, taking its sophisticated family of gods with it. These gods performed bravely and courageously in a super-sized soap opera in the heavens. These myths have carried on into the present Twenty-first century.

If we had been living in Greece back in 300 BC, we would know the exploits of the gods such as Zeus, the most powerful god, the leader of all the others. We would listen to the stories of Perseus, the son of Zeus and a human woman. We would be able to identify with Perseus. He killed the snake-haired Madusa, which made his father happy. If there were t-shirt togas, I can imagine people wearing printing on those togas with sayings such as, "Perseus the Great", or "Zeus is Number I".

We can identify with the Grecian people of 2500 years ago because we have our own heroes. Three years ago, when the Cardinals were having a poor season, the ballpark was packed with fans coming to see their hero Big Mac. Recently we saw a different group of heroes, the New York firefighters and policemen. We will never forget the images of "9-11".

We need to have heroes too. They might be athletes, musicians, movie stars, or God. It seems that we have a need for an identity outside of ourselves.

Essay on modern day slavery

essay on modern day slavery

Media:

essay on modern day slaveryessay on modern day slaveryessay on modern day slaveryessay on modern day slavery